Burnt Toast Editorial

The #NoBullshit Publishing Consultancy

To stand any chance of writing well, you need to read as much as you can, and I read a lot when I was young. From our guest writer, journalist Darren Slade.

To stand any chance of writing well, you need to read as much as you can, and I read a lot when I was young. From our guest writer, journalist Darren Slade.

Most of my evenings end with a spot of reading.

Unfortunately, that period of reading usually lasts for precisely one minute before I lose consciousness and the book tumbles to the floor, closely followed by my glasses. In some ways, that’s frustrating. The working day might be taxing, but it would be nice if my brain had enough energy left by the end of the day to last through more than a page or two before powering down.

Five on a Treasure Island, Enid Blyton. First edition, 1942. By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31764624

On the other hand, it’s pleasing that, with all the demands and distractions that crowd our lives every day, many of us still see reading as the way to unwind and push back the cares of the everyday world for a bit. If you were lucky, reading was the way you were encouraged to relax as a child, and the habit stuck.

To stand any chance of writing well, you need to read as much as you can, and I read a lot when I was young. Some of my happiest childhood memories are of staying awake too late because I was engrossed in a desperately exciting story, like Enid Blyton’s Five on a Treasure Island or David Whitaker’s Doctor Who and the Daleks.

Just as importantly, I read our household’s copy of the Daily Mirror every day. It was always the most tightly written newspaper of them all, and if I have any aptitude at all for writing concisely, it’s probably the result of absorbing that prose style. 

David Whittaker. First Doctor Who scripwriter.

Today, it’s possible to read all day and night without ever picking up a book or newspaper. The internet has shown us just how resilient the written word is. For all the bandwidth taken up by Instagram and YouTube, a huge amount of the online experience is about text.

But while we might consume a lot of words online, it is important sometimes to shun the easy dopamine hit of the internet and go back to good old-fashioned ink on paper. It is a different experience – deeper, more focused and less vulnerable to the impulse to switch tasks. It’s easy to fritter away precious time looking at your phone’s screen, but time spent on a book is rarely wasted.

Sick Puppy, Carl Hiaasen. First edition, 2001.

Susan England is a great champion of text on a page. She’s read a lot of books – and recommended some good ones to me, introducing me to the journalist turned real writer Carl Hiaasen.

She’s an experienced ex-publisher  and editor with lots of ideas. I suspect that the people who use her services will be better writers as a result.

© Darren Slade, 2019.

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Poole-born Darren Slade is a long-serving journalist at the Daily Echo. He has been local government correspondent (covering such controversies as the Imax and the Winter Gardens), chief reporter, occasional columnist and business editor. He recently became group business editor for the Daily Echo Bournemouth, the Southern Daily Echo and the Dorset Echo.  

Darren Slade, © Newsquest, 2019.

He is a politics junkie, a film fan (everything from Woody Allen to Hammer horror) and a book lover who doesn’t get enough reading time but is rarely happier than when reading PG Wodehouse. 

You can follow all of Darren’s reportage on Twitter @echodaz and on Linkedin 

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About the Author

Lala administrator

Tough old London bird who's washed up on the Dorset shore. #PhD and Founder of #publishingconsultancy Burnt Toast Editorial. Very booky.

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